Monday, February 23, 2009

Go Huskies.

Much has been said and written in the past two days about the unfortunate press conference performance of Jim Calhoun after Saturday's game. Colin McEnroe's analysis is particularly insightful.

If you haven't heard, Calhoun's hair trigger temper was set off by law student, and freelance journalist Ken Krayeske's (you might remember his last brush with fame) question about Calhoun's salary. Watch.



You can form your own opinion about Calhoun, or Krayeske. As Jeff Jacobs reports in the Hartford Courant this morning, Calhoun had his numbers wrong. Jacobs also admitted that the UCONN press corps, in fear or fealty, has failed to ask Calhoun the same question, which Jacobs describes as a legitimate question. Still, he questions Krayeske's timing.

I'd say Krayeske had perfect timing. He asked his question. He got his response. And today it's a national story.

While Jacobs, over the years, has been one of the reporters who has fearlessly defied Calhoun's intimidation of the press, the Courant on Sunday reported that "The press conference continued without further incident." This tells you everything you need to know about how important the press conference is and how important the news from such a press conference typically is.

And for all those sports fans who feel that a basketball press conference is somehow sacrosanct, it's time for a review of the Constitution. Calhoun did not have to answer the question. He certainly didn't have to call the journalist "stupid" or tell him to "shut up." He lost his temper, and I'd guess he's regretting it now. Think what you like about Krayeske. He showed more courage than any other reporter in the room.

Another case of the blogs beating the legacy press to the punch.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Jim Calhoun did not choose his salary, his superiors made him an offer and he accepted it.

Whether the salary is too high is the fault of his superiors, not his.

All questions about Jim Calhoun's salary or any other UCONN coaches salary need to be directed at their superiors.

Ed McKeon said...

I can make up rules too.

All state employees who make more than their bosses should be the first to be asked to accept a pay cut.

All state employees who make more than the Governor, should have their salary posted online.

C'mon. Calhoun's a big boy, and he blew this one all by himself.

Kevin L. said...

It's easy to see who's in what camp in regards to their takes on Calhoun and his frequent... oh, let's call them... incidents. Comparing him to Geno is a waste of good ink and paper, and/or bandwidth. With the exception of loud voices and strong opinions these two are total opposite human beings. One of which gives the smug impression he is more important than he actually is; as if to be untouchable in a 'John Gotti' sort of way. Professional College Sports give people like him a lot of unnecessary power. One can use it to your advantage (Geno's method), or abuse it (Jim's method). As for the UConn Press Whores (I mean Corps), don't expect any different from them than the status quo. Apparently not one of them wants to lose their creds & privileges, so they play softball with Coach. Did you hear those whiners when Krayeske outed them for not asking such an awful thing as an honest question? I've been wondering the same thing -- about all high profile sports coaches and players. Why not ante-up for their institutions in some way during these hard times if they can? Are they the banking CEOs of the coaching world? Making their nut and living high on the hog, while their colleagues at their respective schools take pay cuts or lose jobs? I like Professional College Sports less and less with every passing season. If women's college sports ever gets as professionally run as the men's sports, that will be my cue to exit the gym.

Anonymous said...

I am in total agreement that the UCONN coaches salaries ought to be questioned and reviewed.

But, why not interview & pressure the athletic director or the President of UCONN?

Asking Jim Calhoun why he makes too much money is akin to asking a McDonalds worker why they make minimum wage...

Neither one gets at the root of the issue.

HB said...

I don't disagree that intelligent debate could take place over this question but Krayeske's method is a little underhanded. Calhoun overreacted but this wasn't the time or place to debate salary. Who is going to admit they make too much money -you? me? Do any of us feel so guilty about our salaries that we go to our employers and say - hey I can get by on miminum wage - take the extra cash away. Probably not - asking the question of Calhoun does not get to the root of the problem. Calhoun raises ALOT of money for local charity, has brought prestige to UCONN - sorry a successful sports program does that to a university. Krayeske got what he wanted - another 15 minutes of fame which seems more self serving to me than the original debate.

Ed McKeon said...

Underhanded? He asked him a question at a press conference. A tough question, sure. But that's what happens at press conferences. Just because the other reporters were too timid to raise the subject does not make it underhanded.

Calhoun is the highest paid employee in the state. It is a perfectly legitimate question.

Ed McKeon said...

Underhanded? He asked him a question at a press conference. A tough question, sure. But that's what happens at press conferences. Just because the other reporters were too timid to raise the subject does not make it underhanded.

Calhoun is the highest paid employee in the state. It is a perfectly legitimate question.